Travel the dunes with the LEGO� Star Wars™ Ultimate Collector Series Sancrawler™

FBTB - From Bricks To Bothans

Follow us: RSS
News? Questions? Comments? Email!

Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

The official Lego set review forum. Please read the Guidelines before posting!

Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby Staff » Wed Mar 05, 2014 9:08 am

76018 - Full Set

Playsets are always seen as a risky choice in the development of Lego stuff. They often underperform, because they're not swooshable, and apparently kids only like buildings that can also turn into a robot (even if Tom Hanks doesn't think so). I'm pretty far removed from doing anything as a kid, so I know that my opinions are colored by being an adult, and worse, an AFOL, but I'd hazard a guess that kids just don't like playing with bad toys. Playsets, especially Lego playsets, are often just bad toys.

Sure, everyone likes vehicles, and they are rightfully the core of toys about doing stuff. My favorite toy as a kid was G.I. Joe, which has a whole mess of vehicles (including some spectacularly terribad ones), vehicles that were buildings (often with jets for some reason), and just straight up buildings (The Command Center was awesome). What was important with the stuff that was successful is that it made sense with the other stuff. I could put figures in the command center or park vehicles, things like that.

Lego has a tougher time with stuff like that, because sets aren't really designed to "work" together most of the time. This is especially true for the Super Heroes line... where a lot of the stuff is thematically similar, but mostly just sits there. The Quinjet isn't going to pick up the SHIELD truck, and no one wants to put Spider-man in any of those terrible vehicles. So how does Hulk Lab Smash, the Avengers Assemble set in the Marvel Super Heroes lineup measure up to the whole mix like that? At $50, four (or five) minifigs and only 398 pieces, there probably needs to be a whole lot of playset to make it work...



My favorite set from the Avengers movie line was Hulk's Helicarrier Breakout, a $50 set that I thought hit the perfect balance of parts, playset features, and awesome stickers. I know it's a little bit of an odd choice, as well, as most people probably picked the Quinjet instead (which I thought was okay, but not something that blew me away). It actually had a very similar piece count (389 pieces), minifigure count (three + Hulk), and price ($50 as well), but had so much interesting stuff to really make up ground on price-to-piece rules.

Some day, I need to write a nice opinion article on how the price-per-brick ratio, and the idea that 10 cents per part is perfect, just need to be done away with. We treat a minifig accessory that only exists in one set the same as we do a 1x1 stud or a flick-fire, or a technic pin the same as a 1x12 brick, and that means that our assumptions are wrong on value as often as not. Someone with more skill in math and patience in coding needs to write a good algorithm for calculation something better that looks at stuff like rarity, size, and minfigs.

76018 - Minifigs

 

I don't know about you, but the first thing that jumped in my mind when I saw this set first leaked was "MODOK!" He, and three other minifigs (and one brick-built A.I.M. Death Machine), along with Hulk (who Lego apparently says is not a minifig, despite being listed along with the minifigs). I guess this is a change that I've seen before, since astromechs aren't minifigs (something I've actually joked about before, in the Ewok Village review, but never made the connection). In fact, if you check a lot of the product descriptions for sets, it draws a difference between "figure" and "minifigure."

76018 - Hulk

The not minifigure Hulk (which makes more sense than a not-minifigure General Greivous, since there is a minifig Hulk) is the basically the same as the Hulk we got in Helicarrier breakout, except now he has purple pants. I approve, as Hulk should have always had purple pants. Whedon didn't make any mistakes with Avengers, but putting him in khakis just felt wrong. Sure, it makes total logical sense, because who wears purple slacks that isn't also wearing clown makeup, a bright nose, and probably the subject of multiple restraining orders.

76018 - Hulk Back

Basically, if you liked the old Hulk bigfig (or whatever we call them), you're going to like him better in purple pants. I still don't like the hollow arms that he, and figures like him, have, but I get why they do it.

76018 - Falcon

Falcon is a totally new minifigure that makes use of the big wings introduced way back with the Pharaoh's Quest sets that languished on clearance shelves for months and months a few years back (they were terrible sets full of wonderful parts). In the Marvel world, Falcon has been around since the 60s, usually associated with Captain America (and later The Avengers). Sadly, he also has a whole messy history of being misused, which is a shame, because in the comics he's a genuinely cool character.

76018 - Falcon Back

Obviously, this version is based on the Avengers Assemble TV show, and not the comics or the MCU version from Winter Soldier (which is vastly different). Hopefully Falcon shows up in Avengers 2 or something so we get a proper MCU version as well, but for a comic look, this version is just fine. The body in particular does pretty good, and is a good mix of generic and comic looking to lend itself to some other figures or customs. That's where being cartoon over the movie probably is a benefit to us.

76018 - Falcon alt-face

The only knock I have on the figure is the design of the face and alt-face. The smiling face is unsettling for some reason, like he's about to sell me an extended warranty or something, but that's not my big gripe. It's more just the shape of the face under the mask, and how it just looks off. It's a limitation of the minifig head shape, but something about the look is just off. Looking at the Captain America figure that comes with the Hydra set, I'm thinking it's that the eye openings are so large compared to the mouth on this figure, but it's hard to pin down.

76018 - Thor

Thor, like Hulk, has been changed to his cartoon appearance, though the changes are far more apparent on him. The cartoon obviously draws inspiration from the movies, but the color scheme is far more like the comics, and that what we see here. It's not quite classic thor, with the lack of helmet and horns, but it's still far more comic in look than movie. He's also missing the beard in the show (and for most of the time in the comics), leaving us with just the hair as the common element.

76018 - Thor Alt-face

 

I do wonder why Thor didn't get the two-color cape treatment, especially with the dark red/red mix from the Royal Guards in the Death Star Troopers battle pack, since that would fit. Looking at the pictures, that might have been a more accurate look. Still, the red works, and he is Thor after all. Alt-face wise, he's more upset angry than "coffee shouldn't take this long to make" angry on his regular face.

Thor Comparison

The difference between cartoon and movie style is very apparent when you put the two Thors side-by-side, a lot more than hit with Cap in the Hydra set (which was mostly just blue colors). The printing for Thor is darker and simplified on the cartoon version, with harsher lines for the eyebrows and cheeks, and the costume has less detail. Much like Cap, I prefer the movie version, but still, the new one isn't bad. I just like my Thor with a beard. All the coolest people have beards.

76018 - Taskmaster

Taskmaster is probably the niche villain in the set (and in a set that features MODOK, that's saying something), but I guess he's a bit more prominent in the cartoons than the comics. In the comics, he's kind of like Deadpool, except without the humor or insane powers, a sort of joke that swings between rediculous and dangerous with few stops in between.

76018 - Taskmaster alt-Face

He has an alt-face as well, which is slightly different, but it is nice that they didn't use the stock skull head for the guy. The torso is also new, though the printing looks better with the cape and hood on, since you can't see the  unprinted bits on the top between front and back. You have to love the look of trunks that the white waist gives to the dark blue legs, as well.

76018 - MODOK

Okay, let's talk about the reason why most of us are going to buy this set. Well, except Ken, because talking about this figure gets his ire up even more than confusing Ultimate Spider-man figures with movie figures. I'll resist the urge to make this figure his picture on the site, because, while I like to tease him, his complaints are valid. The chair is actually intrinsic to the figure, as MODOK doesn't really walk around. It actually integrates right into some of the features of the set, which is very cool. I love this MODOK figure, but I'm willing to admit... it's a terrible MODOK figure. Just absolutely terrible.

76018 - MODOK Back

At first glance, especially if he's sitting in the chair, you don't really notice what's wrong. MODOK is all about the oversized head, and that certainly is an oversized head. The problem is the body. Let's take a look at a cartoon version of MODOK (this is from the previous Avengers Cartoon, but the design is mostly the same)...

Cartoon MODOK

Big head, okay, we got that. And teeny legs and arms that jut out of that big head. See, MODOK isn't a guy that just mutated or deformed or got hooked on Nerve Tonic while playing for a softball team. Well, not exactly. He was once a guy, but got all juiced up by A.I.M. and turned into Mental Organism Designed Only for Computing. It was the 60s, computers were big and expensive and took up buildings so it made sense to want to use all of the brain power of a person to do math and what not. There's no way that they could have envisioned that an iPhone today would have vastly more computing power than the collective intelligence of every Katy Perry fan.

Of course, turning a tech into a giant head to help solve crossword puzzles tends to tick off your now super-intelligent program, so he turned on him and became MODOK, the Mental Organism Designed Only for Killing. Of course, how the little arms and legs were going to help is yet to be seen, but he was super smart. If Hollywood romantic comedies have taught me anything, it's that the smart guy always gets the girl instead of the big athlete.

76018 - MODOK Interior

The issue is that instead of molding the whole of his character and figuring out a way to attach those stubby little legs (or just molding them on), Lego opted for a full-sized minifig body and the hollow head. Sure, it's awesome to have the torso in pearl gold (which is new), and dark purple legs, arms, and hands are cool, though they've been in a few other superhero sets, but it looks totally wrong for the character. So I'm left in a weird spot, where I like the fact that I have any MODOK figure, and it certainly is visually distinct, but also that it's just an awful figure as a representation of the source. He's better in the chair than by himself, but still, the figure is off badly. Kind of curious to see if anyone can customize or MOC up a better solution.

76018 - Murderbot

He's not a minifig, he's a robot, and all brick-built, but you just have to love an A.I.M. Death Machine (or murderbot, or Turret, or whatever else they've been called in the various marvel comics and game... I know I've smashed thousands of these guys in Marvel Heroes). Lots of nice parts in there too, like the R2 body and the trans-yellow bionacle eyes. Sure, flick-fires, but as missiles, it makes sense. I will say that if you've seen what these normally look like, this is in no way accurate, but a good set addition.

76018 - Unsmashed Lab

The set, at first glance, seems kind of derivative of the Helicarrier Breakout set at first glance. It's similar in size, arrangement, and features some of the same "glass" pieces that were central to that set. One big problem with that set, as a playset, was that the playset pieces were kind of "meh" overall. Sure, you could knock down some barrels, lock up Loki, or swoosh the little jet, but it was mostly just a "sit there" kind of set. For a breakout, there wasn't all that much stuff to break.

This set, by contrast, is just absolutely littered with play features. I've built and reviewed a lot of sets over the years, but I don't think I've seen this level of play integration on a set before. More than that, I'm not sure that play features have ever been so... integrated... into a set before. I liked the Battle of Saleucami because the playset features were front-and-center in the design. It's a controversial opinion, and there is some disagreement (which is cool, because that's how we discuss things and the point of some of reviews) over it. After all, we're AFOLs, not kids, and we judge things differently. Of course, Lego is a kid's toy, and that means what we think as adult collectors really doesn't matter, since we're not the target market or audience. We're like a nice bonus for Lego, which is why we get some nods in a set (like the minifigure assortment included in sets like this).

76018 - MODOKs Laser

This is obviously a set designed squarely at kids that want to play with their toys and make explosive and pew pew pew sounds. My 18-month-old daughter is just as likely to put these things in her mouth as to do anything else with it, but when she found out that the cannon above, which MODOK in his chair clips on to (and is powered by mjolnir, like you see) is designed to be smashed apart, she did so while giggling several times (and interrupting pictures).

76018 - Laser Smashed

Often, the playset features feel so tacked on, just stuck there because there were too many bricks that didn't move or something, like the cannon on the Sail Barge. Other times, it's a huge suck of parts to make a play feature work, and tends to stick out like a sore thumb, like mechanisms that go into firing a flick-fire on a lot of ships (instead of, you know, just using your finger). This gun, however, is built entirely with purpose to be smashed by the Hulk. The gun fits together on either side of a platform that just tucks away, and when you have it built, you would barely notice that it's something to be smashed.

76018 - Scaffold Smashed

Behind the gun is a platform that sits on a pivot and has a pin that holds it up, so you can continue your smashing. Not as cool as the gun, but nicely integrated into the overall set. Real shame we don't have some A.I.M. troopers or technicians to blow up as part of this. That's probably the biggest gap in the set, especially since we got that awesome Hydra trooper in the other set.

76018 - AIM Computers Unsmashed

The middle wall section of the set is another example of integrated play features. It's stickered, and while not as awesome as Space Invaders, they're still pretty slick. I'd love more A.I.M. and keyboard stickers, and the rest could be interesting to pop into different builds. This isn't as slick of a feature as the gun, since smashing walls has been a standard feature for playsets for years, to varying success.

76018 - AIM Computers Smashed

What is different is how it achieves the smashing and build. Most usually stack and do some basic interlocking, like exploding wall section of Helm's Deep, or come up with some weird stud offset pattern, like Colby City Showdown did with the jailbreak section. This one sort of mixes the two and adds a great little cross-piece that holds them in place while balanced on the 1x4 plates with 2 studs at the base. The effect is very cool, cutting down on the extra bulk to hold it into place and adding some stability to the wall until you're ready to smash it. My hat is off to the designer for this one, it's a great implementation for this feature.

 76018 - Adamantium Glass Unsmashed 76018 - Stairs Unsmashed


Continuing our jaunt around the set, we get the part that probably reminds most people of the Helicarrier Breakout set, the prison for Taskmaster to lock up Thor. Again, the playset features are built right in, with a little pivot and 2x4 tile to start the smashing. At first glance, it seems kind of boring to look at, and this section, especially the clear cell up top, isn't nearly as sturdy as the other two. This is due mostly to size of the bricks being used, and the amount of destruction that smashing them can do.

76018 - Glass and Stairs Smashed

That's actually fairly impressive with the parts being used, and continues the trend of well-thought-out play features. Apparently, much like Baby, no one puts Thor in a corner (or a glass tube, as it were).

76018 - Best Use of a Flick-Fire

The set also features the best use of a flick-fire that I've ever seen. And given my feelings on flick-fires, I hope that comes off as high praise. Unfortunately, this is probably the most tacked-on part of the set outside of the communication's dish. I almost wish the antenna would have been scrapped to make a better dish system to put up top, but I guess that's what MOCs are for.

76018 - Lab Back

There is a huge bulk to the set on either side, and really stands as the low-point of the build. You start out building the back and top section, and it initially feels like a very bland and boring build, with all the blue and big panel pieces. Once you start to move on to the other features and the front, though, the build really picks up.

From a playset perspective, this might be one of the best that Lego has ever made. Yes, the part count is light, but a good part of that goes into minfig specialization and some of the larger pieces, which explains the lighter count. But what it has it uses well, and the deep level and thought put into the play features really stand out. This set is a blast to play with, and parts of the build just have though "ooooh, cool" moments that put a set over the top. You get good figure value and some good stickers and parts to boot, making this set a standout, along with the Hydra set, against the barrel scraping that is the Spider-man stuff. The only real knock, outside of the back, is that it lacks an A.I.M. henchman to help out MODOK. I would have loved to see one added to the set, even if it was in the place of Taskmaster, who feels a little out of place, but still, worth the price even with the low count.

What I liked

  • Playset features are well-built, well-designed, and well-integrated into the set. None of them feel like a waste of parts that is far too common in sets like this

  • All-new Minifigure (and "figure") lineup adds a whole lot of value to the set

  • Hulk finally has purple pants!


What I didn't like

  • MODOK is a nice addition, but is probably the worst representation of a character ever in Lego form. Yes, even worse than the original Watto

  • The lack of a generic A.I.M. trooper hurts the set a bit, and would have made a great set into an amazing one

  • Low piece count, and the build starts out very boring and unexciting


Verdict: 4 out of 5. The price could be better, or it could have an A.I.M. Soldier to add value, but this set is just fun to play with. And for a toy, that's all that matters in the end.

You can buy 76018 Hulk Lab Smash right now on Lego Shop@Home, along with (almost) all of the 2014 Super Heroes Line

76018 Box Art
---
Permalink: http://www.fbtb.net/2014/03/05/review-76018-hulk-lab-smash/
Staff
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 8:19 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby CaptainFordo » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:33 pm

I think you're a bit harsh on MODOK. Yes, he's not quite right, but actually in some version he does at least LOOK like a dude sat in a chair, rather than a dude that is a chair.

The Marvel vs Capcom Modok does especially http://i1-games.softpedia-static.com/sc ... iler_6.jpg

I suspect Taskmaster's inclusion in that game is also part of the reason for his inclusion here.

Otherwise, excellent review, it really does look like a significantly better playset than HHB, though I have to say, I think I would still take that set over this, just because I like that jet so much.
CaptainFordo
 
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:42 am

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby dWhisper » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:43 pm

I like the figure, I'm just pointing out that he's very inaccurate. There are all kinds of versions of MODOK, I know, but this one has a very specific basis, and that basis is also the most common, and it doesn't look right at all.
If the above post didn't offend you, you're probably reading it wrong.
dWhisper
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:56 pm
Location: The Arkansas Wasteland

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby CaptainFordo » Wed Mar 05, 2014 4:59 pm

dWhisper wrote:I like the figure, I'm just pointing out that he's very inaccurate. There are all kinds of versions of MODOK, I know, but this one has a very specific basis, and that basis is also the most common, and it doesn't look right at all.


Fair enough. It certainly could be more accurate, but I think they did a good job if they were set on him being a minifig proper.
CaptainFordo
 
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:42 am

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby meiguizi » Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:49 am

Some day, I need to write a nice opinion article on how the price-per-brick ratio, and the idea that 10 cents per part is perfect, just need to be done away with. We treat a minifig accessory that only exists in one set the same as we do a 1x1 stud or a flick-fire, or a technic pin the same as a 1x12 brick, and that means that our assumptions are wrong on value as often as not. Someone with more skill in math and patience in coding needs to write a good algorithm for calculation something better that looks at stuff like rarity, size, and minfigs.


I have to agree. I really hate solely using price per piece as metric of a sets value. I would think a much more useful metric would be price per piece weight, but I don't think that number exists anywhere, aside form the final packaged product, which would be inflated by all of the various inserts and packaging.

Granted, including piece scarcity in that calculation wouldn't be very useful, with sets sitting on shelves for about 3-5 product release cycles, so the calculation for when its new would be very different then when it is retired.

And all of that is before any kind of personal valuation of a specific part. I think almost every AFOL on here as bought an otherwise lackluster set just to get a piece or minfigure that was way too expensive on its own on Bricklink to justify not getting the rest of the set as well.
meiguizi
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:30 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby dWhisper » Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:27 am

*cough* SpongeBob *cough*

The data is actually all there in the various sites. Brickset can tell you pretty well when a part in the same size/color comes in another part (as can the Lego APIs... if you're very patient and hate yourself), and there are aftermarket sellers to look at the average availability. The problem is putting it together... basically, something like...

(Frequency Part Shows Up) x (Frequency in Specific Color) x (Size of Element) x (Avg Qty in Sets) x (Avg Price of Sets) = Value

There are a lot of other things that could go into it, really, but that's the general gist of how it'd start. In my alter-ego from the adventurous world of making bad, snarky jokes about a kids toy online, I do development work, and this is a pretty standard analytics problem. That being said, it'd take someone that has a passion for solving problems like this (which is not me) to work on it, because I don't think you could find a very good way to turn it into something to profit from. Probably why the 10-cent mark exists... it was math most people could do easily.
If the above post didn't offend you, you're probably reading it wrong.
dWhisper
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:56 pm
Location: The Arkansas Wasteland

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby meiguizi » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:01 am

I spend my days surrounded by economists, so I think I've got a pretty good handle on the valuation side of things. I'd absolutely agree with that general formula, granted we could have gigantic flame wars deciding on how much to value each variable. The main problem I see is that the first two variables will change, and could change drastically between when a set is released and when it is retired, so a set from last year with the 1x2 curved slope would have gotten substantially less valuable with this years sets coming out.

Also, any scale really needs to be weighted to properly value the crappiness of any spider-vehicle containing set. It is going to be hard to compensate for the rarity of trans-blue arms right now.
meiguizi
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:30 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby dWhisper » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:25 am

While "big data" isn't my thing, I worked on a team that does pretty much only that (I'm a UI/UX person that does front-end development). I should just get one of my old teammates to work on this for me for free ;)

I think you solve the argument problem by just creating a ratio value and not a price value for it. Take demand out of the mix and just set a target ratio with it, where 1 is the perfect value part. Something not too rare, not too common, at a good price, etc. And then your factors adjust up and down based on that, to a final value calculation. Electro would likely be above 1, and everything else in that just horrible set closer to 0, etc. Studs, technic bars and pins (except the new on in the V-Wing) would all be a lot lower than, say, a 1x12 light grey brick.
If the above post didn't offend you, you're probably reading it wrong.
dWhisper
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:56 pm
Location: The Arkansas Wasteland

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby meiguizi » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:42 am

I tend to frown on relative values, because it would tend to require some subjective valuation, but I think if someone was getting really into the coding of such a theoretic project, it could be avoided by setting it up for a part's value ratio to be determined for any given color by how many sets it comes in out of all released sets.

I am increasingly wishing I spent more time learning coding and less time in political theory classes, but then I have a larval human chewing up most of my free time (but thankfully none of my bricks) so big projects aren't in my immediate future anyway
meiguizi
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:30 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby dWhisper » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:54 am

There already is a whole lot of subjective valuation in what we do though, because I'm going to place higher value on certain things (gray as a castle builder, slopes, minfigs) than I do on others (black and yellow, colors I don't use to build because they don't photograph well).

Even when it comes to minifigs, that's going to vary wildly. I mean, we all agree that the Spider-trike is just an absolutely awful set, but as you said, trans-arms and all... how many of us are going to really wait for a sale or just pay for the Electro figure on the aftermarket? No matter how much I rip the set, he's going for $7-8 by himself (tack on shipping for a minimum $2, usually), which makes the $13 for the terribad set look better.

At least with a relative ratio, we can see if our opinions are in line with reality, even if it makes us still make the decision.
If the above post didn't offend you, you're probably reading it wrong.
dWhisper
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:56 pm
Location: The Arkansas Wasteland

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby meiguizi » Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:09 am

True, true. I've way over-valued sets that fit into a project I was working on that had a few parts that would replace multiple parts I already have with a couple in a new set. Heck, I think I've bought a few sets because they had the two extra 1x4 tiles in the color I needed and didn't want to be bothered with Bricklink.

That's a big part of why I read all of the reviews I can on sets I'm iffy on. I was on the fence on this one, and aside from the MODOK issues, I'm pretty sold now, even if I won't really ever use the play features myself. Granted, sometimes I'm still stubborn, and I buy a set I have no real use for even after the review just because it has some bits I want. Starhopper, I'm looking at you here.
meiguizi
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:30 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby mooslug » Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:50 am

You know, if you remove the Marvel characters and monitor decals you'd have a pretty nice looking Classic Space style lab :)
mooslug
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:59 am
Location: Austin, TX

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby banthafodder » Thu Mar 06, 2014 4:20 pm

Something really bothers me about that Falcon figure. I'm not a comic guy but how does he have a full head mask and have hair over this. Is it a toupe or his real hair pulled through the mask? the MODOK fig doesn't bother me as much as this does.
banthafodder
 
Posts: 707
Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 9:38 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby Mister Ed » Thu Mar 06, 2014 4:48 pm

Seems his mask is similar to the one Wally West had as Kid Flash back in the day.

Image

Image

The hair on the fig doesn't look much like the hair from the show, I guess.
Mister Ed
 
Posts: 1169
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:18 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby MyrmidonX » Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:24 am

Man, I'd love to see a minifig A.I.M. flunky! I think the iconic (and slightly craaazy) helmet would translate to lego wonderfully. Here's hoping!
MyrmidonX
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 7:52 am

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby Athos » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:47 am

I was going to argue with your assessment of playsets and say I preferred them to vehicles, but then I put together the Dol Guldur battle and have been put off of playsets.

Though, stepping away from the mess of Dol Guldur, in general, I think with playsets you get more basic bricks, whereas with vehicles you get a bunch of wedges and slopes. I much prefer basic bricks.

Steve
Athos
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:37 pm

Re: Review: 76018 Hulk Lab Smash

Postby rnsrobot » Mon Mar 10, 2014 11:06 pm

Athos wrote:I was going to argue with your assessment of playsets and say I preferred them to vehicles, but then I put together the Dol Guldur battle and have been put off of playsets.

Though, stepping away from the mess of Dol Guldur, in general, I think with playsets you get more basic bricks, whereas with vehicles you get a bunch of wedges and slopes. I much prefer basic bricks.

Steve


I've always preferred buildings and scenes to vehicles. Probably why I like Castle so much. Spaceships are cool though. Batman is fun, but I need the Batcave and some buildings to place the vehicles around.

I like Dol Goldur, though. Never seeing that movie but I like that set. ^^
rnsrobot
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:54 am


Return to Reviews

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 6 guests