Travel the dunes with the LEGO� Star Wars™ Ultimate Collector Series Sancrawler™

FBTB - From Bricks To Bothans

Follow us: RSS
News? Questions? Comments? Email!

Heat and storage

Want to talk about how the LEGO company is doing, your recent visit to LEGOland, your local LEGO club, other resources in the online LEGO community, or about LEGO software and games? Come in here and join us!

Heat and storage

Postby Bellicose » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:27 pm

I've been grabbing extra sets here and there for the past couple years. I now have enough that it's becoming inconvenient to keep them in the extra bedroom closet, so I'm shuttling some off to my storage unit. Said storage unit isn't climate controlled, and I do live in the inland empire of SoCal...

So how hot until I start having issues? I was guessing the product would be fine stored up to, say, 110, but I was wondering if anybody had any input. I'm sure the bricks are good to go for awhile, but what about the boxes, the plastic bags for the sets? I'd like to keep these in decent shape.
Bellicose
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 4:11 pm
Location: Great Falls, MT

Re: Heat and storage

Postby Draykov » Thu Apr 12, 2012 6:41 am

Found this in LEGO Customer Service/Help Topics/Products/General Product Inquiries FAQ:

How do I sanitize or wash my LEGO elements?

We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear water. Please don't put your bricks in the washing machine or dishwasher or attempt to dry them in ovens, microwaves or with hair dryers. Any electrical parts, such as cables, motors, battery compartments, can only be wiped off with alcohol. Air-dry parts at room temperature. For disinfecting please use mild bleach.


Different context, but I imagine the max temperature still holds true.
Hail Space!
Image
Draykov
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:14 pm
Location: Lone Star

Re: Heat and storage

Postby Mister Ed » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:53 pm

Draykov wrote:Found this in LEGO Customer Service/Help Topics/Products/General Product Inquiries FAQ:

How do I sanitize or wash my LEGO elements?

We recommend that you clean or wash your LEGO parts only by hand at max. 40°C or 104 degrees (F) Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the LEGO parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water, followed by rinsing with clear water. Please don't put your bricks in the washing machine or dishwasher or attempt to dry them in ovens, microwaves or with hair dryers. Any electrical parts, such as cables, motors, battery compartments, can only be wiped off with alcohol. Air-dry parts at room temperature. For disinfecting please use mild bleach.


Different context, but I imagine the max temperature still holds true.


Not necessarily. Heat transfers differently in water vs. air. I expect a somewhat higher air temp. would be OK, though the fact that it would likely be sitting in that temp. for far longer might make a difference.

Though if the storage place has insulation and no windows, even if it doesn't have climate control I'd expect it to stay cooler than the outside temp.

As far as the boxes go, if they aren't in direct sunlight I think it would have to get awfully hot to damage them. Humidity would be a much bigger concern, I'd think.
Mister Ed
 
Posts: 1169
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:18 pm

Re: Heat and storage

Postby Rook » Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:03 pm

At 160F you can pull apart glued pieces and they still keep their shape. I would guess +110F combined with pressure would the actual issue. So using flat trays of keeping them horizontal in their original package. Should keep them from deforming. I'd experiment with a box or two before I put whole collection into storage. Or just check with anyone who has ever stored Lego in Texas or Oklahoma in the summer. :D
Yea, though I walk through the valley...
Rook
 
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:51 am
Location: Ontario

Re: Heat and storage

Postby HoboBob1138 » Thu Apr 12, 2012 9:23 pm

Though if the storage place has insulation and no windows, even if it doesn't have climate control I'd expect it to stay cooler than the outside temp.


Nope, it'll be hotter because the air wouldn't have anywhere to go. Trust me, I unloaded shipping containers one summer in 100 degree weather. If it's a 100 outside, it'll easily be 110 inside or more.
No matter the distance, no matter how far
HoboBob1138
 
Posts: 138
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Heat and storage

Postby Mister Ed » Fri Apr 13, 2012 8:28 am

HoboBob1138 wrote:
Though if the storage place has insulation and no windows, even if it doesn't have climate control I'd expect it to stay cooler than the outside temp.


Nope, it'll be hotter because the air wouldn't have anywhere to go. Trust me, I unloaded shipping containers one summer in 100 degree weather. If it's a 100 outside, it'll easily be 110 inside or more.


Are shipping containers insulated? I didn't think they were, I thought they were just metal, which WOULD heat up quite a bit. I could easily be wrong, my experience is limited, but with insulation and no windows to let in sun, a space SHOULD heat up more slowly than the outside. Maybe the fact that it would cool down more slowly as well would lead to higher average temps over an extended heat spell, I dunno.
Mister Ed
 
Posts: 1169
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:18 pm

Re: Heat and storage

Postby buriedbybricks » Fri Apr 13, 2012 11:22 am

Probably depends on the storage place too, Ed. Most I'm familiar with are little more than cinderblock boxes.

I don't know what farenheit works out to in celcius and I'm too lazy to look it up, but I keep the sets I have stowed away for my son in my basement where the temp fluctuates wildly year round. Half of them are store on a shelf not 8 feet away from my wood stove so the temp in that area is between 30-40 degrees celcius in the winter and when the stove isn't going it can easily cool down to 10 degrees C. In a particularly cold winter the stove is blasting 24-7 from Nov-Apr and a good portion of those sets have been there for 6+ years.

Just recently opened some older sets and the boxes weren't exactly crisp, but everything inside was fine other than very curly books and stickers that still stuck perfectly.

YMMV, but I hope that's helpful.
buriedbybricks
 
Posts: 769
Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 7:41 am
Location: The Great White North

Re: Heat and storage

Postby dWhisper » Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:06 pm

I'd also guess that part of their concern surrounds using hot water and direct contact. Typical shipping containers, in the middle of summer, can easily top out above 150 F (65 C), and the sets work just fine. Not saying go bake your LEGO, but there are things a whole lot worse for sets than heat in storage (moisture, direct sunlight, to name a couple).
If the above post didn't offend you, you're probably reading it wrong.
dWhisper
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:56 pm
Location: The Arkansas Wasteland

Re: Heat and storage

Postby Bellicose » Wed Apr 18, 2012 2:39 am

I do live in inland Southern California, so moisture and in this case sunlight won't be a worry.

Guess I'll keep an eye on this and see how it pans out - some of the sets in question are my investment sets...I'd rather nothing untoward happen to them.
Bellicose
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 4:11 pm
Location: Great Falls, MT


Return to General LEGO Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot] and 3 guests